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ISA ē International Songwriters Association ē Founded 1967 ē Representing Songwriters In More Than 60 Countries Worldwide
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ISA's 'Classic Stage Musical'
Every day, we recommend two London West End or New York Broadway musicals which in our opinion offer outstanding songwriting content. To book tickets, go to visitlondon.com (for the London West End shows), or broadwayleague.com (for the New York Broadway performances)

Jim Liddane ISA's 'Songwriter Hall Of Fame'
The International Songwriters Association's "Hall Of Fame" has been chosen by the members of the ISA since 1981, and by visitors to this site since 1998.

Paul McCartney
The great thing about John and I in the old days was that we didn't have tapes - but that was great because it focused us. We used to say to each other, 'if we can't remember it tomorrow, it's no good.' How memorable is a song that you wrote last night and you can't remember this morning? It's not good.

Bruce Springsteen
I was always concerned with writing to my age at a particular moment. That was the way I would keep faith with the audience that supported me as I went along...I'm a synthesist. I'm always making music. And I make a lot of different kinds of music all the time. Some of it gets finished and some of it doesn't...The best music is essentially there to provide you something to face the world with

Joni Mitchell
You could write a song about some kind of emotional problem you are having, but it would not be a good song, in my eyes, until it went through a period of sensitivity to a moment of clarity. Without that moment of clarity to contribute to the song, it's just complaining

Brian Wilson
It started out ó my mom and dad took a little vacation to Mexico and they left $250 for food. But instead of food we went and bought some instruments. We got a bass, guitar and a set of drums. ... I was 19. Dennis was 15. Carl was 17. Mike was 18. Al was 19. And so we wrote a song called "Surfin'" in my living room. We were all playing and singing and Mike and I wrote a song called "Surfin'" and that's how it all started....The idea of taking a song, envisioning the overall sound in my head and then bringing the arrangement to life in the studioÖwell, that gives me satisfaction like nothing elseÖMy state of being has been elevated, because Iíve been exercising, writing songsÖNo masterpiece ever came overnight. A personís masterpiece is something that you nurture along.Ē

Gordon Lightfoot
'If You Could Read My Mind' was written during the collapse of my marriage. My daughter got me to correct 'The feelings that you lacked' to 'The feelings that we lacked'.

Adele
The way I write my songs is that I have to believe what I'm writing about, and that's why they always end up being so personal - because the kind of artists I like, they convince me, they totally win me over straight away in that thing. Like, 'Oh my God, this song is totally about me.

Carole King
I'm a songwriter first. Sensitive? humbug. Everybody thinks I'm sensitive. In my career I have never felt that my being a woman was an obstacle or an advantage. I guess I've been oblivious.

Little Richard
I've never gotten money from most of those records. And I made those records. In the studio, they'd just give me a bunch of words, I'd make up a song! The rhythm and everything. 'Good Golly Miss Molly'! And I didn't get a dime for it.

Lamont Dozier
I don't think about commercial concerns when I first come up with something. When I sit down at the piano, I try to come up with something that moves me

Paul Simon
How you begin a song is one of the hardest things. The first line of a song is very hard. I always have this image in my mind of a road that goes like this [motions with hands to signify a road that gets wider as it opens out] so that the implication is that the directions arte pointing outward. Itís like a baseball diamond; thereís more and more space out here

Norman Petty
First, he honest with yourself in self-criticism of your ideas. You must believe that what you are doing is different and good, and that it will evoke memories or active thinking in the mind of your listener . . . will bring to life the fact that music is a great denominator in every person's life. Next, the best possible presentation is important, including both your best ideas and a good sound. Probably most people listen for good and different ideas than for good sound, but having both helps. Don't forget connections . . , they are very important to the writer . . . knowing as many artists as possible, being able to communicate with responsible people in music publishing, in recording, in artist representation . . . and you also need patience, but coupled with confidence in yourself. When you have selected a publisher you feel will do the best job for you - give the publisher a chance to work for you.If he is the right publisher and if he believes in you and your song, you will have little need to prod activity on your behalf. After all, the publisher agrees to accept your work because he feels that it will be successful and make money for a long time to come; accordingly the sooner it starts to make money, the happier he will be. But above all - keep writing and practising your craft".

Paul Anka
I had this talent for these stupid little teenage songs. I just couldn't get anyone to sing my songs, so I had to sing my own tunes

Sonny Curtis
Well I wrote most of 'Walk Right Back' one Sunday afternoon, while I was doing my basic training in California, just after I went in the army, although I had the guitar riff for a while. And then Lady Luck stepped in. I never was much for guns, and still am not really into them, but out of 250 men in our unit in basic training, six of us fired expert, and I was one of the six!Anyway, for firing expert, they gave me a three-day pass, and I went straight down to Hollywood, and the Crickets were there, and so were Don and Phil, who were doing some acting classes for movies - they had just signed for Warner Brothers. So J.I. told me to sing the song for Don - actually I had only one verse written - and Don called Phil down, and they worked out a gorgeous harmony part. So they said, "If you write another verse. we'll record it". Anyway, I went back to base, and wrote a second verse, and put it in the mail to them, and next morning, I got a letter from J.I. to tell me that the Everlies had already recorded the song before they got my letter - they had simply recorded the first verse twice! And that's the version that was released, and that's the version that was the hit! The joke is that Perry Como and Andy Williams and a whole bunch of others including myself, recorded the song with the second verse included, but when Anne Murray did it in 1978, she just did the same as the Everlies, just the one verse - and that was a big hit all over again - so maybe the second verse was never meant to be!
Jim Liddane Jim Liddane's Daily Blog

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Jim Liddane
ISA's 'Songwriter Hall Of Fame'
The International Songwriters Association's "Hall Of Fame" has been chosen by the members of the ISA since 1981, and by visitors to this site since 1998. --> Avril Lavigne
I wrote ďGirlfriendĒ when I was drunk. The chorus was written in two minutes. It took nothing. And what's really cool about ďI Can Do BetterĒ is we wrote it, and then I just ran into the booth, and I sang. I laid down the verse, and ... we just used my demo [take]. It was totally different - so much fun!

Amy Winehouse
Songwriting is an exorcism. I get all my stuff out there. If I didnít have this medium to get my experiences across, I would be lost

Billy Joel
I consider myself to be an inept pianist, a bad singer, and a merely competent songwriter. What I do, in my opinion, is by no means extraordinary

Bob Dylan
My best songs were written very quickly. Just about as much time as it takes to write it down is about as long as it takes to write it...In writing songs I've learned as much from Cezanne as I have from Woody Guthrie.

John Lennon
"A Day In The Life ". Just as it sounds: I was reading the paper one day and I noticed two stories. One was the drinks heir who killed himself in a car - one of the Guinness family. Tara Brown. That was the main headline story. He died in London in a car crash. On the next page was a story about 4000 holes in Blackburn, Lancashire. In the streets, that is. They were going to fill them all. Paul's contribution was the beautiful little lick in the song "I'd love to turn you on". I had the bulk of the song and the words, but he contributed this little lick floating around in his head that he couldn't use for anything. I thought it was a damn good piece of work.

James Taylor
I started being a songwriter pretending I could do it, and it turned out I could. To be a musician, especially a singer/songwriter - well, you don't do that if you have a thriving social life. You do it because there's an element of alienation in your life. I wish I could say, 'Oh, that would be great to write a song about.' But what I'm doing is assembling and minimally directing what is sort of unconsciously coming out. It's not something I can direct or control. I just end up being the first person to hear these songs.

Barry Mason
They asked us to do the score for a film titled "Les Bicyclettes De Belsize" - a beautiful, arty film, no dialogue, about a boy on a bike, who falls in love with this girl on a poster. So Les and I do four or five songs, and the day comes to present them to the moguls, and they say, "Great. Wonderful songs, boys - but where's the title song?" So I said, "With all due respect, you just can't write a song called 'Les Bicyclettes De Belsize'. It's not possible". And they said, "We must have a title song. We're in the studio tomorrow. Please!" So Les and I walk back up Charing Cross Road, quite depressed, go into Francis, Day & Hunter, find an office with a piano, get two strong cups of tea - our drugs! - and that afternoon, we wrote it. And ironically, it was the only song in the movie that meant anything. The others were lovely songs but none of them sold, while "Bicyclettes" is now a standard. So that was a lucky break. We were forced to write it.

Andrew Lloyd Webber
I've always enjoyed writing, that was how I managed to lie my way into Oxford University with some of the worst exam results on record; I just wrote a very good essay, won a place at Magdalen College, and left after a term because there was nothing theatrical going on there and I was bored out of my mind. I went part-time to the Royal College of Music, but even my father told me it was a waste of time and that they'd educate my music out of me, so I didn't stay there long either. I don't wish to be told how to write a fugue in four parts in the style of Palestrina. Somehow, I don't see that forming queues at a Broadway box office.

Stephen Sondheim
Clever rhyming is easy, anybody can do itÖOscar Hammerstein II taught me that a song should be like a little one-act play, with an exposition, a development and a conclusion; at the end of the song the character should have moved to a different positionÖCole Porter wrote a valid but entirely different kind of song, in which you take a particular idea and play with it and develop it in terms of cleverness, wit, intellectual or romantic intensityÖThe fact is popular art dates. It grows quaint. How many people feel strongly about Gilbert and Sullivan today compared to those who felt strongly in 1890.

Elton John
If you write great songs with meaning and emotion, they will last forever because songs are the key to everything. Songs will outlast the artist and they will go on for ever if they are good.

George Harrison
We worked the medley on side two of 'Abbey Road' out carefully in advance. All of those mini songs were partly completed tunes; some were written while we were in India a year before. So there was just a bit of chorus here and a verse there. We welded them all together into a routine

Janis Ian
I write a lot from instinct. But as you're writing out of instinct, once you reach a certain level as a songwriter, the craft is always there talking to you in the back of your head...that tells you when it's time to go to the chorus, when it's time to rhyme. Real basic craft... it's second nature

Irving Berlin
You can't write a song out of thin air. You have to feel and know what you are writing about. Talent is only a starting point. You've got to keep working that talent. Someday I'll reach for it and it won't be there.Life is 10 percent what you make it, and 90 percent how you take it. The toughest thing about success is that you've got to keep on being a success. After you get what you want you don't want it. The song is ended, but as the songwriter wrote, the melody lingers on.
International Songwriters Association ē The ISA

The Original Songwriting Centre ē Founded 1967



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The International Songwriters Association

ISA - The International Songwriters Association started life in October 1967,
in Limerick City, with members in just one country - Ireland. Nowadays, the
ISA has songwriting members in more than sixty countries worldwide.


Vote Today For The ISA's Songwriter Hall Of Fame

The International Songwriter's Association Hall Of Fame was founded in June 1981.
Memvers are chosen by their songwriting peers worldwide, and by nobody else.

limerick Limerick Limerick
Limerick City, Ireland - The Birthplace Of The ISA
When the International Songwriters Association was founded in Limerick City, Ireland in October 1967, local native Richard Harris was already a musical (not to mention acting) legend. Since then, Limerick has produced everything from Bill Whelan's Riverdance to the Cranberries

Looking For A Songwriter?
Selling Your Songs
Writing the perfect song should be the most complicated part of the songwriting
process. But frequently, it is difficult to sell even the perfect song. However, do not
despair! It can be done and it is being done by songwriters every single day of the week.
Click on this line, or on the picture above to learn more about Selling Your Songs

Barry Mann Willie Nelson Bob Gaudio
Interview


Abba
Lys Assia
The Premier Songwriting Contest - The Eurovision
From Lys Assia (Switzerland 1956), to Maneskin who won for Italy in 2021, we examine the winners (and the losers) in what has become the most famous (or infamous) song contest in the world - Le Grand-Prix Eurovision de la Chanson Europťenne. OK, The Eurovision!

Selling Your Songs Selling Your Songs Selling Your Songs
Songs Required This Week
Almost every day, we are contacted by singers, bands, managers, record labels and music publishers, seeking new unpublished songs for recording purposes. Just click any of the pictures above and have a quick look at this week's song requirements and opportunities.

Looking For A Songwriter?
Looking For A Hit Songwriter?
Singers, bands, and managers seeking hit songs, contact us daily. If you are looking for top-quality unpublished songs, then an International Songwriters Association songwriter will be more than happy to oblige.  And at no cost to you. Just click the picture above!

Sir Andrew Lloyd Webber Interview
The New York Times referred to Sir Andrew Lloyd Webber as "the most commercially successful composer in history". He was ranked the "fifth most powerful person in British culture" by The Telegraph. And International Songwriters Association members consistently
vote his Evita as "the best musical of all time". Sheridan Morley spoke to him for the ISA

Norman Petty Interview
Norman Petty remains one of rock music's most outstanding figures, as a songwriter ("Wheels"), record producer ("That'll Be The Day"), performer ("Almost Paradise"), manager (Buddy Holly) and recording engineer ("Sugar Shack"). He rarely gave interviews, but he was only too happy to speak to Jim Liddane for the International Songwriters Association.

Marijohn Wilkin Marijohn Wilkin Marijohn Wilkin Marijohn Wilkin Marijohn Wilkin
Marijohn Wilkin Interview
When Marijohn Wilkin received her first copy of International Songwriters Association's "Songwriter Magazine" in 1981, one might have been forgiven for thinking that she was at the peak of her career. After all, she had a song recorded by the Beatles! Not so - as she was to prove in the years after that. Marijohn Wilkin, doyenne of female songwriters, tells us her story.

Terry Noon - Music Publisher Terry Noon - Music Publisher Terry Noon - Music Publisher Terry Noon - Music Publisher
Terry Noon Interview
"The only thing I had was an E-type Jaguar, my pride and joy. I absolutely doted on that car, and I sold it, to start Noon Music. It was the hardest thing but it was the only way I could raise money". Legendary UK publisher and all-round nice guy, Terry Noon talks.

Gene Pitney - Songwriter Gene Pitney - Songwriter Gene Pitney - Songwriter Gene Pitney - Songwriter Gene Pitney - Songwriter
Gene Pitney Interview
"Today's Teardrops by Roy Orbison was a big hit, but not my biggest songwriting hit. That was Hello Mary Lou which I gave to Rick Nelson, and I've spent a lifetime analysing why it was as big as it was". The legend Gene Pitney, who wrote songs for The Crystals and Bobby Vee, talked to Jim Liddane of the ISA about his separate songwriting career.

Hal Shaper - Songwriter Hal Shaper - Songwriter Hal Shaper - Songwriter Hal Shaper - Songwriter Hal Shaper - Songwriter
Hal Shaper Interview
"In the early days, I had no instinct towards fame or fortune, I just liked being a songwriter. I always used to wake up thinking, 'I can't imagine why everyone in the world doesn't write songs for a living!" Hal Shaper tells how an ambition to be a songwriter led to a career in publishing.

Barry Mason - Songwriter Barry Mason - Songwriter Barry Mason - Songwriter Barry Mason - Songwriter Barry Mason - Songwriter
Barry Mason Interview
"I wrote a song called Girl Of Mine for Elvis and there were two versions made of that.  One with just the rhythm section, for the fans, without The Jordanaires or violins -  and that's the version I've got". One of the greatest of British songwriters of all time, legend Barry Mason, tells all.

Lionel Bart - Songwriter Lionel Bart - Songwriter Lionel Bart - Songwriter Lionel Bart - Songwriter Lionel Bart - Songwriter
Lionel Bart Interview
"I wrote songs for Cliff for the film. The Living Doll song itself -  one morning, I was looking at the Sunday Mirror, I think, and I saw this ad for a doll that did everything. And I thought, "That'll do". Lionel Bart modestly makes the writing of an all-time classic sound so very easy!

Sonny Curtis - Songwriter Sonny Curtis - Songwriter Sonny Curtis - Songwriter Sonny Curtis - Songwriter Sonny Curtis - Songwriter
Sonny Curtis Interview
"Leo Sayer, a songwriter himself, was in his hotel room, watching television, and on came More Than I Can Say in this K-Tel commercial and he said - 'Wow, I always wanted to do that song'. And he did!" Sonny Curtis, writer of countless classic songs for stars such as Hank Williams Jr and Andy Willams, tells all to Jim Liddane of the International Songwriters Association.

ISA ē International Songwriters Association (1967) Ltd
PO Box 46 ē Limerick City ē Ireland ē Tel 061-228837 ē Fax 061-2288379
ISA Website  http://www.songwriter.co.uk ē E-Mail  internationalsongwriters@gmail.com

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This site is published by the International Songwriters Association Ltd, and will introduce you to the world of songwriting. It will explain music business terms and help you understand the business concepts that you should be familiar with, thus enabling you to ask more intelligent questions when you meet with your accountant/CPA or solicitor/lawyer. However, although this website includes information about legal issues and legal developments as well as accounting issues and accounting developments, it is not meant to be a replacement for professional advice. Such materials are for informational purposes only and may not reflect the most current legal/accounting developments. Every effort has been made to make this site as complete and as accurate as possible, but no warranty or fitness is implied. The information provided is on an "as is" basis and the author(s) and the publisher shall have neither liability nor responsibility to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damages arising from the information contained on this site. No steps should be taken without seeking competent legal and/or accounting advice

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